Kohlrabi Cilantro Salsa for 20

 Kohlrabi cilantro salsa ingredients

Kohlrabi is a member of the brassica family and is cousin to vegetables such as cabbage, brussel sprouts and broccoli. Brassica vegetables are so real, you can’t even handle it. They are known for their sulfurous smells and super green taste. Some poor souls are actually turned off by this.

sliced kohlrabi

What haters might not know is just how versatile the family is. They pickle and ferment like bosses, they can be eaten raw in salads or just as is and they’re loaded with good-for-you fibers and minerals. They also rock any stews and stir fries you might want to try.

kohlrabi cilantro salsa mix

Even though kohlrabi looks a bit like the UFO of the vegetable kingdom on the outside, it actually has a very pleasant and sweet taste. If a sweet broccoli ever existed in prehistoric times, it eventually evolved into the kohlrabi.

kohlrabi cilantro salsa

This recipe yields about a gallon of salsa. If you are like me, it will be gone in a few days, but if it is too much for you or your kitchen, use a smaller kohlrabi (or just half) and fewer tomatoes. Adjust measurements for your pleasure. Hang loose.

kohlrabi cilantro salsa1

This is a fairly watery salsa. I do not recommend draining it as much of the flavour lies in the liquid. Dip chips for a snack, top on toast with an egg for brunch or just dig in with a spoon. Serves 15-20 and will keep in your fridge for a week, although it probably won’t last long enough to go bad. Enjoy!

 

Kohlrabi Cilantro Salsa

 

Ingredients

  • 1 large kohlrabi (any colour)
  • 3-4 diced medium tomatoes
  • 1 diced large yellow onion
  • 1 deseeded and diced bell pepper
  • 2-3 minced cloves of garlic
  • 1 washed and chopped bunch of fresh cilantro (including stems)
  • 1 can of black olives
  • 1 can of sweet corn
  • 1-5 chilies (depending on your tolerance… I like it spicy, so I used 5)
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon cracked black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon worstershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon black sesame seeds (for garnish)

Directions

Peel all the skin off the kohlrabi, including the fibrous inner layer, until only the white inside remains. Slice into thin, 5 milimeter slices. Cut the slices into thin sticks and then dice into small pieces.

Place the kohlrabi into a large mixing bowl.

Open the can of olives and drain most of the water (I added a little into my salsa for flavour). Smash olives with the flat side of knife and chop into rough pieces or you could just crush the whole olives in your hands. Add to the kohlrabi. Drain the can of corn and add to the mix.

Add all of the remaining ingredients and mix well. Garnish with cilantro leaves and sesame seeds.

 

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Where Cabbage is Concerned…

…size does matter.

Cabbage kiss

This beautiful Brassica came from the Abode farm. We’ve formed a little bit of a love affair, the cabbage and I.

He is such a man. He opens doors for me and he pays for my dinner. He’s got so much green he practically gives it away. As you can see, we are a very affectionate couple.

Last night was a big night for us. First, I quartered him and shredded him with a knife and then I put him in a bowl. Then I added some shredded carrots, chopped onions and parsley to said bowl. Oh, how hearty did we party.

Slaw ingredients

Next, I felt we really needed to grease things up, so I splashed in some balsamic glaze along with sesame and olive oil. Things were getting crazy.

Of course, we couldn’t go further without the added excitement of salt, black pepper, cumin, paprika and dijon mustard. We considered inviting mayonnaise (we have a bit of a dependency) but decided to go without.

Light coleslaw

After shouting out his name a few times, my lovely cabbage and I made beautiful coleslaw together. What a night.

Light Coleslaw

Ingredients

    • A Brassica of your own (cabbage), shredded
    • 1-2 Shredded carrot
    • Chopped parsley
    • Chopped onion
    • Balsamic vinegar glaze
    • Sesame oil
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
    • Black pepper
    • Cumin powder
    • Paprika
    • Dijon mustard

Directions

Mix all ingredients to taste.

All spices (including dijon) should be about ½ tsp, but you should adjust according to preference.

Variations

Use a more flamboyant purple cabbage, instead of green.

Lemon or apple cider vinegar could be used instead of balsamic.

Stone ground mustard is lighter than dijon, so if you’re a bit squeamish when mustard is involved, it could be a good replacement.

Mayonnaise. Do it.